National meeting to address technological application in colorectal disease

Posted 08 September 2013 in

A new national centre for innovation in colorectal therapies is hosting its inaugural ‘annual event’ to stimulate novel and exciting ideas to advance patient care.

The event, entitled ‘Accelerating technology for patient benefit in colorectal disease’, will be held at the Royal Armouries in Leeds, in October – and brings together world leading speakers, scientists and engineers.

The National Institute for Health Research Colorectal Therapies Healthcare Technology Co-operative (NIHR Colorectal Therapies HTC) based at Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust is one of eight national HTCs funded by the NIHR. HTCs have been created to address a gap in the medical technologies innovation pathway. By bringing together partners from the NHS, academia, industry, funders, and patients and public, the HTCs will generate new ideas and interventions that target areas of unmet clinical need.

Following a successful regional launch in May, the NIHR Colorectal Therapies HTC is looking to expand its network and reach out to open-minded and innovative individuals and organisations to drive the development of new technologies for application in colorectal disease.

The HTC will focus on three key areas for development in Colorectal Therapies: nanotechnology, biosensing and engineering. The HTC will stimulate blue-sky thinking to generate new ideas to be taken through concept development and evaluation, to funding and commercial partnerships.

The HTC is currently working on projects with several SMEs in the Yorkshire region and wishes to expand its commercial links across the UK technology network.

The national event, which is free of charge, is open to broad-minded clinicians with a passion for advancing colorectal therapies, creative scientists and engineers wishing to apply or expand their expertise in this clinical area, industry partners involved in materials or device technologies, and patients with real-life experience of colorectal disease.

Plenary lectures will be delivered by high-profile speakers, including:

Sir Mark Welland, Head of the Nanoscience Centre, Department of Engineering at the University of Cambridge. Professor Welland has previously served as Chief Scientific Advisor in the UK Ministry of Defence and will be speaking about what technology has done to advance the medical sector and its future potential, with a specific focus on nanotechnology.

Dr Larry Nagahara, Director of the Office of Physical Sciences-Oncology and National Cancer Institute in the USA. He will be speaking about his experience of setting up centres in the US, similar to HTCs, for engaging physical scientists and clinicians to develop new technologies for the treatment of cancer.

Dr Richard Satava, Professor Emeritus of Surgery at the University of Washington Medical Centre and Senior Scientific Advisor to US Army Medical Research and Material Command (USAMRMC) is a pioneer in surgical robotics and telemedicine and will be speaking about future technological advancements in medicine, with a specific focus on surgical application.

Professor David Jayne, of the University of Leeds and Clinical Director of the NIHR Colorectal Therapies HTC said: “This meeting will bring together the best experts from engineering and science to apply their knowledge to areas of unmet clinical need identified by NHS clinicians and patients and the public. It will be a fascinating day leading to fruitful partnerships that will develop the next generation of innovative treatments for patients with colorectal disease.”

The NIHR Colorectal Therapies HTC inaugural event will take place at the Leeds Royal Armouries on 17 October 2013 (http://www.royalarmouries.org).

For details and to book your free place please visit: http://www.colorectaltherapieshtc.eventbrite.co.uk or follow the HTC on Twitter @ColorectalHTC to keep updated.

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Notes to Editors

The National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) is funded by the Department of Health to improve the health and wealth of the nation through research. Since its establishment in April 2006, the NIHR has transformed research in the NHS. It has increased the volume of applied health research for the benefit of patients and the public, driven faster translation of basic science discoveries into tangible benefits for patients and the economy, and developed and supported the people who conduct and contribute to applied health research. The NIHR plays a key role in the Government’s strategy for economic growth, attracting investment by the life-sciences industries through its world-class infrastructure for health research. Together, the NIHR people, programmes, centres of excellence and systems represent the most integrated health research system in the world. For further information, visit the NIHR website (http://www.nihr.ac.uk).

The 2008 Research Assessment Exercise showed the University of Leeds to be the UK’s eighth biggest research powerhouse. The University is one of the largest higher education institutions in the UK and a member of the Russell Group of research-intensive universities. The University’s vision is to secure a place among the world’s top 50 by 2015. www.leeds.ac.uk .