Discrete-choice experiment to analyse preferences for centralizing specialist cancer surgery services

Posted 16 April 2018 in

BJS has just released their editorial on IMPACT

The BJS has released an editorial Progress and future direction in the management of advanced colorectal cancer and has also published an original article on Discrete-choice experiment to analyse preferences for centralizing specialist cancer surgery services

We are appreciative that our IMPACT patient representative Steve Clark has produced a video response which can be viewed here

The transcript of the video is as follows:

“Hi, my name’s Steve Clark, I have stage 4 colorectal (bowel) cancer. I’ve just been asked to comment on a new survey being published in the BJS, the title is “Discrete-choice experiment to analyse preferences for centralizing specialist cancer surgery services”. Basically, it’s a large survey looking at whether people would be willing to travel longer distances for their cancer care.

There is a clear need in the UK to reduce the variation in care between cancer centres, this seems to be especially important regarding specialist surgery for things like colorectal tumours.

I’ve highlighted this for a while and standardising care is one of the core areas for the IMPACT initiative, a UK project between specialist colorectal surgeons, specialist oncologists and the patient organisations.

This survey in BJS supports what I see on the Beating Bowel Cancer online forum where people are definitely willing and even keen to travel to receive the best specialist care for things like operations, but not for routine care such as for chemotherapy.

I hope this survey is used to help redesign specialist cancer services in the UK, but it must be noted that it doesn’t support centralisation of all cancer care. It’s vital that care is available locally, especially for routine things like chemo. But it seems to be increasingly essential that recognised regional and national centres specialising in specific types of cancer are developed so they can offer the best and latest treatments such as surgery with the aim of increasing patient survival.”